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Letters to the Editor

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That Tigrett "Note" on Beale

First, to the grande dame of Beale Street who lied to the press when he said, "He sent us a letter" (letter was only sent to the Memphis Flyer website on February 25th): You, sir, are the poster boy for term limits. Please tell us again exactly how you got the lease for Beale Street?

Second, to the blasphemer who is so "wired" that he insulted Memphis music and every musician on the planet — past, present, and future: Sir, there is an important post opening up at the Visitors Bureau in Baghdad. Please take it! And by the way, I saw ol' Abel today. He said to tell you he's looking for you.

Third, to anyone in the Bluff City who wishes to cross swords with this bloody, mad Scotsman (who should be locked up in a monastery!): As my lifelong friend and fellow Jacksonian, rockabilly king Carl Perkins, once "warned" me, "Don't step on my damn blue suede shoes!!!"

With love and respect to my musical Memphis ...

Isaac Burton Tigrett

Nilayam, India

I've known the Tigrett family since Isaac Tigrett and I grew up together in Jackson, Tennessee, and I've been a friend and colleague of Pat Kerr Tigrett's for the past 20 years. I respect Isaac's professional and charitable accomplishments, but his recent letter sent to the Flyer and others was deeply misinformed and indefensible.

Pat Kerr Tigrett has been sincerely committed to celebrating Memphis music and raising public awareness of Memphis musicians for decades. That's why she founded the Blues Ball in 1994. Nearly 200 Memphis musicians have found thousands of new fans through performing at this annual benefit. Pat is a loyal friend to many of those musicians, and she's quietly helped a number of them when they needed help the most.

The brass notes on Beale Street are meant to honor important musicians and those who have supported and helped them along the way. Pat clearly belongs in the second category, and her desire to share the honor with her family seems, to me, to be a sign of generosity of spirit. If Isaac didn't wish to be included, there were certainly simpler and less mean-spirited ways to communicate his wishes.

The John Burton Tigrett Award in Jackson that Isaac attacked was actually created by the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation to honor Tennesseans who have had a lasting impact nationally and globally. They chose Pat as their first honoree for her international success as a designer. This year's honoree was Senator Howard Baker, for his political and diplomatic achievements.

Isaac based his criticism on two honors that he clearly knows little about and that came to Pat from organizations she's not involved with. They seem to have been convenient conduits for a deep-seated anger that has more to do with personal issues than with the sanctity of either Memphis music or the Tigrett name. We can only hope that, in his time in the monastery in India, Isaac will be able to find the balance and peace that obviously have eluded him so far.

Joe Mulherin

Memphis

Not Forgotten

Thank you for remembering our fallen soldiers who risk their lives for our liberties ("Not Forgotten," February 21st issue).

As a member of Bartlett Hills Baptist Church (BHBC), I was particularly pleased to read Bianca Phillips' article on Lance Corporal Timothy Creager. I never knew Tim, as I was relatively new here at the time he was deployed. Four years later, now as a deacon at BHBC, I can say his memory lives on. This can be seen in the memorial race that bears his name: the Tim Creager 5K.

Thank you, Flyer, for honoring Tim and our fallen servants in a dignified and compassionate way.

Steve Hogel

Bartlett

Herenton's Appointees

Other than "intelligence, dedication, work ethic, and loyalty," what qualifications must a $59,133-a-year police lieutenant possess to earn a 70 percent salary increase (to $100,848) and the title of public works director?

As one of Mayor Herenton's former bodyguards, his experience in dealing with bovine excrement should serve him well in overseeing his new waste-management responsibilities. This appointment and the four others announced in mid-February are the epitome of cronyism. Three of the people appointed to $100,000 positions are former bodyguards. And the police department has recruiting problems?

Jim Easter

Memphis

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