Oy to the World

| December 18, 2008
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What do dreidels and dim sum have in common? Well, let's see: They're both smaller than an adult fist. And they weigh only a few ounces each, and ... that's about it. The dreidel is a Hebrew invention: a four-sided top made of wood, paper, or — according to the famous Hanukkah song — clay. They are central to a traditional Hanukkah game wherein little girls and boys take turns spinning the top to see who will win small prizes and jackpots of chocolate money.

Dim sum, on the other hand, is the phrase used to describe an array of succulent steamed, boiled, fried, or baked Chinese dumplings that are stuffed with vegetables, meats, and occasionally sweets. They are often rather sticky and don't spin very well at all.

"When you ask the question 'What do Jews do for Christmas?,' 'Eat Chinese food' will be one of the answers," says Temple Israel's assistant rabbi Adam Grossman. Grossman is a co-founder of "Dreidels and Dim Sum," a Christmas Eve party for Jewish adults between the ages of 22 and 39.

While "Dreidels and Dim Sum" is hosted by Temple Israel, the event is open to all Jewish congregations. "It's about community," Grossman says. "[It's] about creating fresh ways for Jewish people to gather together as Jews outside the temple walls."

The dreidels start spinning at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 24th, at Dō and the Beauty Shop. The event features heavy appetizers, a cash bar, and live music by Mojo Possum.

"Dreidels and Dim Sum," Wednesday, December 24th, at 7:30 p.m. at Do and the Beauty Shop. For additional information,

e-mail Celia Mutchnick at celiam@timemphis.org. RSVPs must be received by Saturday, December 20th.

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