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Sound Advice

The Flyer's music writers tell you where you can go.

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The tiny Map Room is playing host to two bands this week that just seem like they would be way too loud for the venue. Then again, the Map Room has never shied away from acts that, in terms of personality, popularity, or decibels, seem too large for its claustrophobic confines. Old fogy that I am, I'd heartily recommend picking up a set of industrial-strength ear plugs before heading down to the corner of Madison and Main for a pair of fantastic shows. On Monday, October 15th, Oneida rolls in from Brooklyn to deliver a straight shot of ecstatic guitar squall mixed with gurgling keys and plenty of static. Drummer Kid Millions gets all over the cymbals like Keith Moon's less stable grandson. Oneida shifts easily from meathead cocaine anthems to heady psychedelic tirades on the way things are. The Chris Parker Trio, a significantly less loud jazz combo, will be playing upstairs before Oneida goes on. Weird.

Agnostic Front, the most metal of all self-righteous '80s hardcore bands, will bring their laundry list of unrest to the Map Room on Tuesday, October 16th. A.F. owned CBGB's during the Reagan years, so if getting mad at the system and thrashing your cares away "old school" is your kind of thing, this show comes highly recommended. -- Chris Davis

The Hi-Tone Café this weekend showcases a couple of the local acts that were highlighted on this year's fine Makeshift Records compilation. Fronted by label founder Brad Postlethwaite, Snowglobe is the DIY label's flagship act and maybe the best young band in town. With gently psychedelic songwriting and a diverse instrumental palette, Snowglobe, who'll be at the Hi-Tone on Saturday, October 13th, bring something a little different to the local club scene. But first, on Friday, October 12th, you might want to head down to the club to check out Mouse Rocket, a "side" project from Alicja Trout of the Lost Sounds. Mouse Rocket offers a more accessible take on the garage-y new wave that the Lost Sounds practice, and the "band"'s performance at the Makeshift compilation release parties earlier this year drew the strongest word of mouth of any of the participants. -- Chris Herrington

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